Diabetes & High Blood Pressure
Prevention & Management Services

UHPhealth delivers affordable, accessible, community-based healthcare services through our two safety net clinics to under-served uninsured and under-insured communities. We are member of both National Association of free and charitable clinics (NAFCC) and Texas Association of charitable clinics (TXACC). At UHPhealth, we believe that Health & Wellness are Human basic right that all communities deserve and healthy living involves all aspects of a person’s life. Therefore we address Social  Determinants of Health (SDH).

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but losing weight, eating healthy food, and being active can really help. Taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education and support, and keeping health care appointments can also reduce the impact of diabetes on your life.

Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. Approximately 5-10% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need to take insulin every day to survive. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.

 Type 2 With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and can’t keep blood sugar at normal levels. About 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2. It develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (but more and more in children, teens, and young adults). You may not notice any symptoms, so it’s important to get your blood sugar tested if you’re at risk. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, eating healthy food, and being active.

Gestational diabetes develops in pregnant women who have never had diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your baby could be at higher risk for health problems. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born but increases your risk for type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to have obesity as a child or teen, and more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life too.

 In the United States, 88 million adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. More than 84% of them don’t know they have it. With prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes raises your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. If you have prediabetes there is lifestyle programs that can help you take healthy steps to reverse it. 

 

 If you have and of the following diabetes symptoms, please see one of our doctors about getting your blood sugar tested. 

  • Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night
  • Are very thirsty
  • Lose weight without trying
  • Are very hungry
  • Have blurry vision
  • Have numb or tingling hands or feet
  • Feel very tired
  • Have very dry skin
  • Have sores that heal slowly
  • Have more infections than usual

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

People who have type 1 diabetes may also have nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can develop in just a few weeks or months and can be severe. The disease usually starts when you’re a child, teen, or young adult but can happen at any age. 

Type 1 Diabetes Risk Factors

  • Family history: Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes.
  • Age: You can get type 1 diabetes at any age, but it’s more likely to develop when you’re a child, teen, or young adult.

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

More and more children and teens are developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes usually starts when you’re an adult, though more and more kids and teens develop it. Because symptoms are hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for the disease.

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors 

  • Have prediabetes
  • Are overweight
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)+

Ask one of our doctors on how you can improve your lifestyle to prevent or delay Type 2 Diabetes.

Prediabetes 

You’re at risk for developing prediabetes if you:

  • Are overweight
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)

You can prevent or reverse prediabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes. These include losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity.

Gestational Diabetes

If you’re pregnant, your doctor should test you for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) usually doesn’t have any symptoms. You can make changes to protect your health and your baby’s health if needed.

Gestational Diabetes Risk Factors

  • Had gestational diabetes during a previous pregnancy
  • Have given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are overweight
  • Are more than 25 years old
  • Have a family history of type 2 diabetes
  • Have a hormone disorder called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander

 

 

You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes with proven, achievable lifestyle changes—such as losing a small amount of weight and getting more physically active—even if you’re at high risk. 

Ask one of our doctors on what healthy steps to take.

Ask one of our doctors on what steps to take to learn how to manage your diabetes.  Learning how to manage your diabetes is important because:

  • People who have the knowledge and support to manage their diabetes are healthier than those who do not.
  • Learning how to control your diabetes will save money and time, and help you have fewer emergency and hospital visits.
  • Knowing how and when to take your medication, how to monitor your blood sugar (glucose), and how to take care of yourself, helps you manage your diabetes better.
  • Managing your diabetes will help you avoid or delay serious health complications.

What is High Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure is blood pressure that is higher than normal. The higher your blood pressure levels, the more risk you have for other health problems, such as heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

High blood pressure usually has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people do not know they have it. Measuring your blood pressure is the only way to know whether you have high blood pressure. 

Ask one of our doctors if you have questions about your blood pressure.

People with high blood pressure can lower their blood pressure or keep their numbers in a healthy range by making lifestyle changes.

  • Getting at least 150 minutes of physical activity each week (about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week)
  • Not smoking
  • Eating a healthy diet, including limiting sodium (salt) and alcohol
  • Keeping a healthy weight
  • Managing stress

Ask one of our doctors to learn more ways on how to prevent high blood pressure 

 

In addition to making positive lifestyle changes, some people with high blood pressure need to take medicine to manage their blood pressure.

Talk to one of our doctors if you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure but do not have it under control.

 

We are a participant in Texas Community Partner Program which is a bridge between Texas Health and Human Services and Texas communities to provide Texans access to food, cash and additional health care assistance. We work closely with individuals to navigate potential benefits that can support their basic life needs.

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